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A Multidisciplinary Bibliography
The Arts and Humanities
Art
Movin' On by Irmagean What did it mean for a black woman to be an artist in our grandmothers' time? In our great-grandmothers' day? It is an answer cruel enough to stop the blood.
Alice Walker

...how does the African American woman artist locate herself within postmodernism? How does she present her views about power and, through art, highlight the dialogic relationship with the viewer about oppression, repression, blackness, and femaleness...? Because it can articulate meaning about class, race, and gender, art is consequential...at the core is cultural politics. Who is empowered; who speaks for whom?
Sharon Patton

Als, Hilton. "The Shadow Act: Kara Walker's Vision." New Yorker 8 October 2007, 70-79.

Amos, Emma. "Dos and Don'ts for Black Women Artists." Heresies: A Feminist Publication on Art and Politics 15 (1982): 17.

          . "Changing the Subject." In Bad Girls/Good Girls: Women, Sex and Power in the Nineties, eds. Nan Bauer Maglin and Donna Perry. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 1996.

Barnwell, Andrea.D. "Been to Africa and Back: Contextualizing Howardena Pindell's Abstract Art." International Review of African American Art. 13, no. 3 (1996): 42-49.

Bearing Witness: Contemporary Art by African American Women Artists. New York: Rizzoli, 1996.

Bowles, John. "'Acting Like a Man': Adrian Piper's Mythic Being and Black Feminism in the 1970s." Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society 32, no. 3 (Spring 2007): 621-648.

          . Adrian Piper: Race, Gender, and Embodiment. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2011.

Brown, Jacqueline. "Making Sense of the Past for the Future." Feminist Art News 3, no. 7 (1991): 16-18.

Carpenter, Jane H, with Betye Saar. Betye Saar San Francisco: Pomegranate, 2003.

Cliff, Michelle. "'I found God in Myself and I loved Her I loved Her / I Loved Her Fiercely': More Thoughts on the Work of Black Women Artists". In Feminism-Art-Theory: An Anthology, 1968-2000, ed. Hilary Robinson. Malden, MA: Blackweell Publishers, 2001.

          ."Object Into Subject: Some Thoughts on the Work of Black Women Artists." Heresies 15: Racism is the Issue 4 (1982): 43. Reprinted in Making Face, Making Soul / Haciendo Caras: Creative and Critical Perspectives by Feminists of Color, ed. Gloria Anzaldua (San Francisco: Aunt Lute Books, 1990).

Collins, Lisa. "Economies of the Flesh: Representing the Black Female body in Art." In Skin Deep, Spirit Strong: The Black Female Body in American Culture, ed. Kimberley Wallace-Sanders. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002.

Collins, Lisa Gail. The Art of History: African American Women Artists Engage the Past. New Brunswick, NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002.

Cooks, Bridget R. "See Me Now." Camera Obscura 36 (September 1995): 67-83.

Dallow, Jessica. "Reclaiming Histories: Betye and Alison Saar, Feminism, and the Representation of Black Womanhood." Feminist Studies 30, no. 1 (Spring 2004): 75-113.

Davis, Angela Y. "Other Landscapes." In Art/Women/California 1950-2000, eds. Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni. Berkeley: University of Californai Press and San Jose Museum of Art, 2002.

Dixon, Annette, ed. Kara Walker: Pictures From Another Time Ann Arbor, MI: University of Michighan Museum of Art, 2002.

Edmondson, Belinda. "Black Aesthetics, Feminist Aesthetics, and the Problems of Oppositional Discourse." Cultural Critique 22 (1992): 75-98. Reprinted in Feminism-Art-Theory: An Anthology 1968-2000, ed. Hilary Robinson (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2001).

Enwezor, Okwui. "Social Grace: The Work of Lorna Simpson." Third Text 35 (Summer 1996): 43-58.

Farrington, Lisa. Art on Fire: The Politics of Race and Sex in the Paintings of Faith Ringgold. New York: Millennium Fine Arts Publishing, 1999.

          . Creating Their Own Image: The History of African-American Women Artists. New York: Oxford University Press, 2005.

          . "Faith Ringgold's Slave Rape Series." In Skin Deep, Spirit Strong: The Black Female Body in American Culture, ed. Kimberley Wallace-Sanders. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002.

Fitzgerald, Sharon. "Catalyst Camille." American Visions, December-January 1995, 20-25.

Flomenhaft, Eleanor, ed. Faith Ringgold: A Twenty-Five Year Survey.Hempstead New York: Fine Arts Museum of Long Island, 1990.

Graulich, Melody and Mara Witzling. "The Freedom to Say What She Pleases: A Conversation with Faith Ringgold." NWSA 6, no. 1 (1994): 1-27

Haug, Kate. "Myth and Matriarchy: An Analysis of the Mammy Stereotyp". In Dirt and Domesticity: Constructions of the Feminine. New York: Whitney Museum of Art, 1992.

hooks, bell. Art on my Mind. New York: New Press, 1995.

          . "In Our Glory: Photography and Black Life." In Picturing Us: African American Identity in Photography, ed. Deborah Willis. New York: New Press, 1994.

          . "Lorna Simpson: Waterbearer." Artforum International September 1993.

          . "An Aesthetic of Blackness: Strange and Oppositional." Yearning: Race, Gender, and Cultural Politics. Boston: South End Press, 1990.

Jackson, Phyllis J. "Liberating Blackness and Interrogating Whiteness." In Art/Women/Califorania 1950-2000, eds. Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni. Berkeley: University of California Press and San Jose Museum of Art, 2002.

Johnson, Lakesia. "The Iconography of the Black Female Revolutionary and New Narratives of Justice." PhD diss., The Ohio State University, 2008. Proquest (AAT3325579).

Jones, Jacquie. "How Come Nobody Told Me About the Lynching?" In Picturing Us: African American Identity in Photography, ed. Deborah Willis. New York: New Press, 1995.

Jones, Kellie. "In Their Own Image: Black Women Artists Who Combine Text With Photography." Artforum 29 (November 1990): 132-138.

Jones, Kellie, Thelma Golden and Chrissie Iles. Lorna Simpson. New York: Phaidon, 2002.

Lamm, Kimberly. "Potraits of the Past: Reading the Work of Carrie Mae Weems and Lorna Simpson." In Remaking Race, Making Soul: Transformative Aesthetics and the Practice of Freedom, eds. Christa Davis Acampora and Angela L. Cotten. Albany: State University Press of New York, 2007.


Muhammad, Erika. "Ellen Gallagher's Head Trip." Ms. September-October 1988, 84-85.

Nelson, Charmaine A. The Color of Stone: Sculpting the Black Female Subject in Nineteenth-Century America. Minneapolis:University of Minnesota Press, 2007.

O'Grady, Lorraine. "Olympia's Maid: Reclaiming Black Female Subjectivity." Afterimage 20 (Summer 1992): 14-15, 23. Reprinted in Art, Activism, and Oppositionality: Essays From Afterimage, ed. Kester H. Grant. (Durham: NC: Duke University Press, 1998). Reprinted in The Feminism and Visual Culture Reader, ed. Amelia Jones (New York: Routledge, 2003). Reprinted in New Feminist Criticism: Art, Identity, Action, eds. Joanna Frueh, Cassandra L. Langer, and Arlene Raven. (New York: Icon Editions, 1994).

Patton, Sharon. "Living Fearlessly With and Within Difference: Emma Amos, Carol Ann Carter, and Martha Jackson-Jarvis. "In African American Visual Aesthetics: A Postmodern View, ed. David C. Driskell. Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press, 45-78.

Piper, Adrian. "The Triple Negation of Colored Women Artists." In Next Generation: Southern Black Aesthetic, ed. Devinis Szakacs and Vicki Kopf (Winton-Salem, NC: South Eastern Center for Contemporary Art, 1990). Reprinted in The Feminism and Visual Culture Reader, ed. Amelia Jones, (New York: Routledge, 2003); also reprinted in Feminism-Art-Theory: An Anthology 1968-2000, ed. Hilary Robinson (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2001)

          ."Xenophobia and the Indexical Present." In Reimaging America: The Arts of Social Change, eds. Mark O'Brien and Craig Little. Philadelphia: New Society Publishers, 1990.

Sims, Lowery S."Aspects of Performance in the Work of Black American Women Artists." In Feminist Art Criticism: An Anthology, ed. Arlene Raven. Ann Arbor, MI: UMI Research Press , 1988.

          ."Race Riots. Cocktail Parties. Black Panthers. Moon Shots and Feminists: Faith Ringgold's Observations on the 1960s in America." In The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History. New York: IconEditions, 1992.Originally published in Faith Ringgold: A Twenty-Five Year Survey, ed. Flomenhaft, Eleanor. (Hempstead, NY: Fine Arts Museum of Long Island, 1990).

Richard, Nelly. "Abundant Evidence: Black Women Artists of the 60s and 70s." In Wack! Art and the Feminist Revolution, ed. Lisa Gabrielle Mark. Los Angeles: The Museum of Contemporary Art; Cambridge: MIT Press, 2007.

Ringgold, Smith. We Flew Over the Bridge: The Memoirs of Faith Ringgold. Boston: Little Brown, 1995.

Smith, Valerie. "Camille Billops: Facing the Spectre of Racism. " October 1994, 60-61.

Tesfagiorgis, Freida High. "Afrofemcentrism and its Fruition in the Art of Elizabeth Catlett and Faith Ringgold (A View of Women by Women)." Sage: A Scholarly Journal on Black Women 4, no. 1 (1987): 25-32. Reprinted in Feminism-Art-Theory: An Anthology 1968-2000, ed. Hilary Robinson (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2001).

          . "Interweaving Black Feminism and Art History: Framing Nigeria." In Contemporary Textures: MultiDimensionality in Nigerian Art. Binghamton, NY: Binghamton Univerty (International Society for the Study of Africa), 1999.

Thompson, Cheryl. "Contesting the Aunt Jemima Trademark Through Feminist Art: Why is She Still Smiling?" n.paradoxa 31 (2013): 65-75.

          . "In Search of a Discourse and Critiques That Center the Art of Black Women Artists." Theorizing Black Feminisms: The Visionary Pragmatism of Black Women, eds. Stanlie M. James and Abena P.A. Busia.New York: Routledge, 1993.

Thompson, Kathleen and Hilary MacAustin, eds. The Face of Our Past: Images of Black Women From Colonial America to the Present. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1999.

Walker, Kara. Kara Walker: Narratives of a Negress. Cambridge: Massachusettes Institute of Technology Press, 2003.

          . "Mickalene Thoma." Bomb no. 17 (Spring 2009): 72-73.

Wallace, Michele. "The Dah Principal: To Be Continued." In Invisibility Blues From Pop to Theory. New York: Verso, 1998. Originally published in Faith Ringgold: Twenty Years of Painting Sculptor, Performance. (New York: The Studio Museum, 1984).

          . "Daring to Do the Unpopular." Ms. September 1973, 24-27.

          . "Defacing History." Art in America December 1990, 120-129.

          . "Feminism, Race and the Division of Labor." Division of Labor: "Women's Work" in Contemporary Art. New York: The Bronx Museum of Arts, 1995.

          . "Modernism, Postmodernism and the Problem of the Visual in Afro-American Culture." Out There: Marginalization and Contemporary Cultures, Ed. Russell Ferguson, et al. New York: The New Museum of Contemporary Art; Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 1990. Reprinted in Aesthetics in Feminist Perspective, eds. Hilde Hein and Carolyn Korsmeyer (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1993).

          . "Tim Rollins + K.O.S.: The 'Amerika Series." Amerika: Tim Rollins + K.O.S., Ed. Gary Garrels. New York: Dia Arts Foundation, 1989.

          . "Why Are There No Great Black Artists? The Problem of Visuality in African American Culture." In Dark Designs and Visual Culture. Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2004.

Williams, Carla. "Naked, Neutered, or Noble: The Black Female Body in America and the Problem of Photographic History." In Skin Deep, Spirit Strong: The Black Female Body in American Culture, ed. Kimberley Wallace-Sanders. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2002.

Willis, Deborah. "Searching for Memories: Visualizing My Art and Our Work." In Sister Circle: Black Women and Work, eds. Sharon Harley and The Black Women and Work Collective. New Brunswick,NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2002.

Willis, Deborah, ed. Black Venus 2010: They Called Her Hottentot. Philadelphia: Temple Universtiy Press, 2010.

Willis, Deborah and Carla Williams. The Black Female Body: A Photographic History. Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 2002.

Wilson, Judith. "Barbara Chase Riboud: Sculpting Our History." Essence December 1979, 12-13.

          . "Beauty Rites: Toward an Anatomy of Culture in African American Women's Art." International Review of African American Art 11, no 3 (1994): 11-17, 47-55.

          . "Down the Crossroads: The Art of Alison Saar." Callaloo 14, no. 1 (1991): 107-123.Originally published in Third Text no. 10 (Spring 1990).

          ."Getting Down to Get Over: Romare Bearden's Use of Pornography and the Problem of the Black Female Body in Afro-U.S. Art." In Black Popular Culture: A Project by Michele Wallace, ed. Gina Dent. Seattle: Bay Press, 1992. Reprinted in Feminism-Art-Theory: An Anthology 1968-2000, ed. Hilary Robinson (Malden, MA: Blackwell Publishers, 2001)

          . "How the Invisible Woman Got Herself on the cultural Maps: Black Women Artists in California." In Art/Women/Califorania 1950-2000, eds. Diana Burgess Fuller and Daniela Salvioni. Berkeley: University of California Press and San Jose Museum of Art, 2002.

          . In Memory of the News and Ourselves: The Art of Adrian Piper." Third Text 16-17 (1991): 39-64.

          . "One Way or Another: Black Feminist Visual Theory." In The Feminism and Visual Culture Reader, ed. Amelia Jones. New York: Routledge, 2003.

          . "Optical Illusions: Images of Miscegenation in Nineteenth and Twentieth Century American Art." American Art 5 (1991): 89-107.

          . "Sniffing Elephant Bones: The Poetics of Race in the Art of Ellen Gallagher." Callaloo 19 no. 2 (1996): 337-339.

          . "What Are We Doing Here: Cultural Difference in Photographic Theory and Practice." SF Camerawork Quarterly 17 (199?): 27-30.

Zabunyan, Elvan. "African American Women Artists: 'The Personal is Political'." In Black is a Color: A History of African American Art. Paris: Editions Dis Voir, 2005.


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border spacer gutter spacer This Web site was made possible by a grant from the Librarians Association of the University of California. Author: Sherri L. Barnes, UCSB Libraries.
Updated: 6/18/13
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All images, artwork, and design are copyrighted © and may not be used or reproduced without the express written consent from the following: Background image extrapolated from "True Self" © Karin Turner. "Movin' On" © Irmagean. Site design © Gwen Harlow. License to use images may be available through private treaty with the artist.
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